HM7 Aquapod goes green

Inspired by a jellyfish, MB&F’s HM7 Aquapod gets a verdant update.  This time, the aquatic-inspired machine comes with a titanium case and green sapphire crystal bezel.

Limited to just 50 pieces, the piece features a central flying tourbillon atop the concentric vertical movement , with indications radiating out from the centre.

The concept of the three-dimensional, spherical movement architecture is centuries old, originating in the “onion” pocket watches popular in the 18th century. Whereas the majority of watch movements are developed horizontally to be as flat as possible, the Engine of HM7 goes up, not out, with all of its components arranged vertically.  From bottom to top, the winding rotor, mainspring barrel, hour and minute indications, and flying tourbillon are all concentrically mounted around the central axis. Energy travels from the rotor at the very bottom of the movement to the flying tourbillon regulator at the very top via gearing acting like a series of stairs, allowing power to transition from one level to the next.

This concentric architecture allows for the hours and minutes to be displayed around the periphery of the movement.

The winding rotor’s tentacles are crafted from a solid block of titanium; their very three-dimensional nature makes machining and finishing extremely challenging. Underneath the tentacles, a platinum mass ensures powerful and efficient winding. The 303-component, 72-hour power reserve HM7 Engine was developed in-house by MB&F.

While Horological Machine No.7 is not a dive watch, it is a timepiece comfortably at home in the water – so MB&F added the one element that all serious aquatic watches possess: a unidirectional rotating bezel. However, unlike every other dive watch on the planet, Aquapod’s bezel isn’t attached to the case, but floats apart like a life buoy.

Hours and minutes are displayed by two spherical segment discs in aluminium and titanium, which are supported by specially developed oversized ceramic ball bearings. The hour and minute numerals and markers have been hand-painted in Super-LumiNova, making them legible by night. They are hand-painted, because it is impossible to print neatly on such complexly-curved components.